Coronavirus

A customer wearing a face mask waits to buy vegetables. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

B.C. experts predict COVID cases, hospital admissions will rise due to BA.5

Latest report from the B.C. COVID-19 Modelling Group says cases will rise through July

A customer wearing a face mask waits to buy vegetables. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
A jar full of empty COVID-19 vaccine vials is shown at the Junction Chemist pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
A jar full of empty COVID-19 vaccine vials is shown at the Junction Chemist pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
A jar full of empty COVID-19 vaccine vials is shown at the Junction Chemist pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

B.C. rolling out fourth COVID-19 vaccine dose in the fall

Come September, all British Columbians aged 12 and up will have access to a fourth dose

A jar full of empty COVID-19 vaccine vials is shown at the Junction Chemist pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
A disposable face mask is shown attached to a woman’s arm in Old Montreal, Sunday, July 18 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

COVID hospitalizations jump by nearly 100 as B.C. experts warn of third Omicron wave

Health Minister Adrian Dix will provide an update on vaccination Friday at 1 p.m.

A disposable face mask is shown attached to a woman’s arm in Old Montreal, Sunday, July 18 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Vials of both Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines sit empty on the counter at the Junction Chemist Pharmacy, in Toronto on June 18, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

More than half of Canada’s AstraZeneca vaccine doses expired, will be thrown out

13.6 million doses earmarked for donation have expired and will have to be discarded

Vials of both Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines sit empty on the counter at the Junction Chemist Pharmacy, in Toronto on June 18, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Pictured during 2015, Aaron Craven (right) is with his mother, Patricia Craven (center), and his father, Donald Craven (left), who passed away in 2018. (Photo: Aaron Craven/ B.C. Alzheimer's Society).

Advocates want more consistency in B.C.’s extended care visitation policies post-pandemic

Constantly shifting rules around essential visitors hard on people’s mental health

Pictured during 2015, Aaron Craven (right) is with his mother, Patricia Craven (center), and his father, Donald Craven (left), who passed away in 2018. (Photo: Aaron Craven/ B.C. Alzheimer's Society).
A man displays his COVID-19 rapid test kit. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

B.C. COVID hospitalizations remain steady, 17 new deaths reported

The latest data from the BCCDC shows 273 people currently in hospital and 32 in critical care

A man displays his COVID-19 rapid test kit. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
A jar full of empty COVID-19 vaccine vials is shown at the Junction Chemist pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Canadians urged to catch up on vaccinations, prepare for fall boosters

Canada’s chief public health officer stressing importance of up-to-date vaccination status

A jar full of empty COVID-19 vaccine vials is shown at the Junction Chemist pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Canada handled the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic and weathered the ensuing upheaval better than several other nations with comparable health-care and economic infrastructure, a new study suggests. People wait in line to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in Montreal, Saturday, June 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Canada’s COVID-19 pandemic response compares well with other countries, study finds

Persistent public health measures, successful vaccination campaign worked: study

Canada handled the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic and weathered the ensuing upheaval better than several other nations with comparable health-care and economic infrastructure, a new study suggests. People wait in line to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in Montreal, Saturday, June 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
FILE - Registered nurse Shelly Girardin, left, is illuminated by the glow of a computer monitor as Dr. Shane Wilson examines COVID-19 patient Neva Azinger. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

B.C. records slight drop in COVID hospitalizations, new admissions on the decline

The number of hospitalizations is down by three from last week

FILE - Registered nurse Shelly Girardin, left, is illuminated by the glow of a computer monitor as Dr. Shane Wilson examines COVID-19 patient Neva Azinger. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
A man arrives with two young girls for his shot at the COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Ontario Food Terminal in Toronto on Tuesday May 11, 2021. Federal officials say regulators should reach a decision about whether to approve Canada’s first COVID-19 vaccine for infants and preschoolers in coming weeks as the U.S. prepares to roll out tot-sized shots. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Canada expected to finish review of first COVID-19 shot for youngest kids in weeks

Canada still reviewing Moderna’s application for a vaccine for kids between six months and five years

A man arrives with two young girls for his shot at the COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Ontario Food Terminal in Toronto on Tuesday May 11, 2021. Federal officials say regulators should reach a decision about whether to approve Canada’s first COVID-19 vaccine for infants and preschoolers in coming weeks as the U.S. prepares to roll out tot-sized shots. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
People walk and cycle on the seawall between English Bay and Sunset Beach, in Vancouver, on Sunday, March 22, 2020. An extensive new survey data suggests Canadians have more trust in their institutions and their neighbours since the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Study finds COVID-19 made most Canadians more trusting, depending on their income

New paper takes a look at how attitudes changed throughout the pandemic

People walk and cycle on the seawall between English Bay and Sunset Beach, in Vancouver, on Sunday, March 22, 2020. An extensive new survey data suggests Canadians have more trust in their institutions and their neighbours since the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
An Air Canada jet flies past a cell phone tower as it comes in to land at Pearson Airport in Toronto on Thursday January 20, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Nixed vaccine mandate to let hundreds of suspended airport employees back to work

Feds announced Tuesday that federally regulated employees no longer have to be fully vaccinated

An Air Canada jet flies past a cell phone tower as it comes in to land at Pearson Airport in Toronto on Thursday January 20, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
People wait in line to check in at Pearson International Airport in Toronto on Thursday, May 12, 2022. Sources confirm the federal government is putting an end to COVID-19 vaccine mandates for domestic and outbound international travellers and public sector workers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
People wait in line to check in at Pearson International Airport in Toronto on Thursday, May 12, 2022. Sources confirm the federal government is putting an end to COVID-19 vaccine mandates for domestic and outbound international travellers and public sector workers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau removes his mask before answering questions at an announcement in Ottawa, on Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Professor of medicine says no need to panic over COVID-19 reinfection

Expert encourages everyone to do a personal risk assessment to prevent reinfection

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau removes his mask before answering questions at an announcement in Ottawa, on Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
People wait in line to check in at Pearson International Airport in Toronto on Thursday, May 12, 2022. Sources confirm the federal government is putting an end to COVID-19 vaccine mandates for domestic and outbound international travellers and public sector workers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Federal government to end COVID-19 vaccine mandates: sources

Announcement affecting federal workers, domestic and outbound travellers expected Tuesday afternoon

People wait in line to check in at Pearson International Airport in Toronto on Thursday, May 12, 2022. Sources confirm the federal government is putting an end to COVID-19 vaccine mandates for domestic and outbound international travellers and public sector workers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a closing press conference following the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, Calif., on Friday, June 10, 2022. Trudeau says he has tested positive for COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a closing press conference following the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, Calif., on Friday, June 10, 2022. Trudeau says he has tested positive for COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
A blood donor clinic pictured at a shopping mall in Calgary, Alta., Friday, March 27, 2020. Canadian Blood Services says it is struggling to replenish a critically low national supply caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Number of Canadian blood donors plummets to lowest point in a decade during COVID-19

Canadian Blood Services: number of people across Canada who donate regularly has decreased by 31,000

A blood donor clinic pictured at a shopping mall in Calgary, Alta., Friday, March 27, 2020. Canadian Blood Services says it is struggling to replenish a critically low national supply caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Registered Nurse Manjot Kaur Munday prepares to attend a COVID-19 patient at the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at Surrey Memorial Hospital in Surrey, B.C., Friday, June 4, 2021. A lack of data tracking Canadians who have had COVID-19 could hinder efforts to understand potential post-infection conditions, such as diabetes and brain fog, experts have warned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

COVID data void in Canada could hamper understanding of lingering impact: experts

Reliance on at-home rapid testing causing major gap in COVID numbers

Registered Nurse Manjot Kaur Munday prepares to attend a COVID-19 patient at the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at Surrey Memorial Hospital in Surrey, B.C., Friday, June 4, 2021. A lack of data tracking Canadians who have had COVID-19 could hinder efforts to understand potential post-infection conditions, such as diabetes and brain fog, experts have warned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A University of British Columbia researcher says it’s unclear what the cause of the majority of B.C.’s deaths during 18-months of the pandemic is. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. saw more deaths than expected over 18 months, but research can’t pinpoint why

Only 22 per cent of excess deaths during research period are directly attributed to COVID-19

A University of British Columbia researcher says it’s unclear what the cause of the majority of B.C.’s deaths during 18-months of the pandemic is. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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