Indigenous reconcilliation

Vancouver Island First Nations and others gather on the lawn of the legislature to honour the 215 children who never came home from a Kamloops residential school. The timing of the discovery will affect Victoria’s marking of July 1 as Canada Day this year. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)

Victoria cancels Canada Day events out of respect for First Nations

Reconciliation-based hour-long TV presentation to air later this summer, rather than July 1

 

A group drums under the Peace Arch monument during an international vigil at Peace Arch Park Saturday (June 5, 2021), after the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation confirmed there were remains of at least 215 Indigenous children at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops. (Photo: Lauren Collins)

Cross-border gathering at Surrey’s Peace Arch Park honours 215 Indigenous children

International mourning ceremony hosted by Lummi, Southern First Nations

 

The Delta School District held a ceremony at the school board office in Ladner Tuesday morning (June 1) to honour the 215 children found buried on the site of a former residential school in Kamloops and all those impacted by the residential school system. Attendees hung 215 orange hearts on cedar trees planted this spring as part of the district’s Giving Tree Project, and placed children’s shoes around the central tree. (Delta School District photo)

Delta School District honours residential school victims

215 orange hearts were hung on cedar trees, with children’s shoes placed around the central tree

The Delta School District held a ceremony at the school board office in Ladner Tuesday morning (June 1) to honour the 215 children found buried on the site of a former residential school in Kamloops and all those impacted by the residential school system. Attendees hung 215 orange hearts on cedar trees planted this spring as part of the district’s Giving Tree Project, and placed children’s shoes around the central tree. (Delta School District photo)
Delta council began with an Indigenous land acknowledgement for the first time on Monday, May 10, 2021.

Delta council opens first meeting with Indigenous land acknowledgement

Acknowledgment will be read at the start of each council/committee meeting and City of Delta event

Delta council began with an Indigenous land acknowledgement for the first time on Monday, May 10, 2021.
Delta City Hall. (James Smith photo)

Delta council meetings, public events to begin with Indigenous land acknowledgment

Metro Vancouver, eight cities in the region, Delta School District all have similar practices

Delta City Hall. (James Smith photo)
Neilson Grove Elementary students water their new cedar tree. As part of its commitment to reconciliation, the Delta School District is planting a cedar tree at every school and district site as a way to show appreciation and respect for local First Nation culture through its Giving Tree Project. (Delta School District photo)

Cedars planted at Delta schools as part of reconciliation

‘Giving Tree Project’ a way to show respect and appreciation for First Nation culture

Neilson Grove Elementary students water their new cedar tree. As part of its commitment to reconciliation, the Delta School District is planting a cedar tree at every school and district site as a way to show appreciation and respect for local First Nation culture through its Giving Tree Project. (Delta School District photo)
Bob Joseph the bestselling author of ‘21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act’ has been an enabler for discourses about the Indian Act, since his 2015 blog post about the legislation went viral. (Courtesy of Vancouver Island Regional Library)

Bob Joseph: Why the Indian Act must go and Canada will be better for it

B.C. author explores the paradox of why it’s so difficult to let the act go and why it has to happen

Bob Joseph the bestselling author of ‘21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act’ has been an enabler for discourses about the Indian Act, since his 2015 blog post about the legislation went viral. (Courtesy of Vancouver Island Regional Library)
Janet Austin, lieutenant governor of British Columbia stands by a canoe carved by former lieutenant governor Steven Point. The canoe named Shxwtitostel (pronounced: Schwe-tea-tos-tel) means “a safe place to cross the river” in Halq’eméylem and is currently on display at the B.C. Legislature building. (Office of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia photo)

New award launched to celebrate champions of reconciliation in B.C.

Reconciliation Award launched by Lieutenant Governor, BC Achievement Foundation

Janet Austin, lieutenant governor of British Columbia stands by a canoe carved by former lieutenant governor Steven Point. The canoe named Shxwtitostel (pronounced: Schwe-tea-tos-tel) means “a safe place to cross the river” in Halq’eméylem and is currently on display at the B.C. Legislature building. (Office of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia photo)
James Taylor, a member of the Mississauga Ojibwe Nation, will set out on Sept. 20 to walk from Hope back home to Greater Victoria in just five days to honour survivors of trauma and to acknowledge those who never came home. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

‘Each step is a prayer’: Ojibwe man will walk from Hope to Vancouver Island for Indigenous healing, reconciliation

James Taylor departs Sept. 20, returns to Saanich in five days for sacred fire

James Taylor, a member of the Mississauga Ojibwe Nation, will set out on Sept. 20 to walk from Hope back home to Greater Victoria in just five days to honour survivors of trauma and to acknowledge those who never came home. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)
Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson speaks to media during the Liberal cabinet retreat at the Fairmont Hotel in Winnipeg, Sunday, Jan. 19, 2020.They blighted Indigenous lives for more than a century. Now their creation is being formally recognized as one of the events that helped shape today’s Canada The federal government has put residential schools on the official roster of National Historic Events. Two of the schools, one in Nova Scotia and one in Manitoba, have been named National Historic Sites — the first in Canada to be so marked. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mike Sudoma

Sites to be commemorated: Residential schools recognized as ‘historic event’

Doing so was one of the recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson speaks to media during the Liberal cabinet retreat at the Fairmont Hotel in Winnipeg, Sunday, Jan. 19, 2020.They blighted Indigenous lives for more than a century. Now their creation is being formally recognized as one of the events that helped shape today’s Canada The federal government has put residential schools on the official roster of National Historic Events. Two of the schools, one in Nova Scotia and one in Manitoba, have been named National Historic Sites — the first in Canada to be so marked. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mike Sudoma
People shouted in protest and cheered in joy as the Sir John A. Macdonald statue was removed from Victoria’s City Hall on Aug. 11, 2018 (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)

City of Victoria considers donating Sir John A. Macdonald statue to province

In a budget meeting Mayor and Council discussed options for the controversial statue

People shouted in protest and cheered in joy as the Sir John A. Macdonald statue was removed from Victoria’s City Hall on Aug. 11, 2018 (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)