Terry and Rhonda Zachary have created Trickor Halloween Trading Cards as an alternative to handing out candy on Halloween. The collectible cards are designed to teach kids life lessons on a variety of themes.

Couple offers cards as treat alternative

Collectible cards designed by Langley couple created to discuss, teach values

Mhost the Ghost is part mummy, part ghost and part green glob.

He gets along with everybody yet doesn’t really feel like he ‘belongs’ anywhere.

This used to make him sad, but now he enjoys having many friends and many interest. Mhost find it easy to accept people for who they are, even if they appear ‘different.’

This is the story of Mhost the Ghost, one of the characters created by Langley’s Terry and Rhonda Zachary.

After five years of planning, the married couple launched their new business, Trickor Halloween Trading Cards.

They used to hand out toothbrushes and silly putty to trick-or-treaters.

Halloween is one true opportunity for households to interact with kids in the neighbourhood.

“We thought we have three seconds to talk to a trick-or-treater … what value can we teach them?” Terry explained.

Terry works as a health and fitness entrepreneur — and has developed several products — while Rhonda specializes in child and youth mental health.

They sat down and brainstormed values they wanted to instill in youth. From that, they created 25 different characters.

The characters — Mhost was the first one — each have a story as well as a theme.

For Melvin, it is the message of ‘Do you ever feel like you don’t belong to a specific group? Do you accept people who appear ‘different?’

The cards come in packs of four and there are a total of 76 collectible trading cards that help tell the story of the Halloween town of Treetville, where all citizens are respected and valued.

In addition to character cards, there are games, puzzles, Halloween trivia and tongue twisters, and the five message cards of Treetville.

Some of the themes the cards touch on are celebrating uniqueness, acceptance of others, passions, bullying, school safety and health.

Terry admits the cards act like a Trojan Horse, a treat with a message slipped inside to teach kids.

“This is to get their attention,” he said.

“This gets kids to ask themselves questions and stimulate talks with their family.”

The other goal of the cards was to accommodate the Teal Pumpkin Project, which aims to raise awareness of food allergies and promotes inclusion of all trick or treaters.

“Not all kids can have candy,” Rhonda said.

“This offers something else fun and unique.”

•••

The couple have a booth set up at Willowbrook Shopping Centre to sell their cards. They are also available at Season’s in Fort Langley, Hallowville Manor in Langley, at the Port Kells Nursery and Art’s Nursery on the Surrey/Langley border. They can also be ordered at www.trickor.ca.

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