Lost and found in Cloverdale’s Bose Corn Maze

CLOVERDALE — In life, there are the eager beavers, the wanderers and those who stop to smell the roses.

And you learn a lot about which type you are during a trip through the Bose Corn Maze.

Me? I’m a wanderer, as is my mom.

But my cousin and her family, they’re all eager beavers.

For them, it was all about getting the job done – navigating through the weave of trails cut into the cornfields to get the puzzle completed as quickly as possible.

For me? It was more about an enjoyable walk through the farm. About visiting with my family and watching my children play in the dirt and look around in wonder at the scenery.

Dwarfed by corn plants of up to 13 feet in height, people pay up to $7 each for the thrill of walking the maze, which opened for the season in August and continues until harvest time in mid-October.

And on a recent evening, it was our turn.

Before the eight of us entered the Cloverdale fields, we were told a few things.

First, the maze is divided into two parts.

In each half, there are numbered posts with a set of trivia questions.

Get the questions right, and you’ll be led in the right direction.

Assuming you go the correct way, you will be led to the next numbered post.

And on and on it goes, until you make it all the way through.

Truth be told, I didn’t pay much attention to which way I was going. I knew I’d make it to the end eventually.

At one point, I unfolded a piece of paper the farm operator had given to my son before we began the adventure.

Turns out, it was a separate set of questions that led one through the maze – much easier questions, meant for children.

I won’t lie to you. My mother and I may have snuck a peak at the questions once or twice.

At one point during our journey through the second half of the maze, one of the farmers found my mother and I wandering around.

Clearly it was his job to find the lost folks, and nudge them into the right direction. Yes, that was us. And they’ll have you know – they haven’t lost anyone yet.

In our defense, the second half was more difficult than the first.

The pattern carved out of the cornfield probably had everything to do with that.

Each year, a different design is chosen. Past years have featured mazes done in the shape of the Grey Cup game logo, Hockey Canada and other designs. This year, the Vancouver Whitecaps’ current logo and original logo were cut into the fields, in celebration of the soccer team’s 40th anniversary.

The second design is far more intricate, thus making it much more difficult to find one’s way around.

That’s my excuse, anyway, and I’m sticking to it.

For those who are particularly adventurous, the maze stays open after dark – just be sure to remember to bring a flashlight.

And as an added bonus for nighttime maze-goers, once finished there are always marshmallows to roast at the fire pit.

But if you’re a wanderer, I suggest sticking to daylight. Not sure how I would have fared in the dark.

So go, give yourself a good amount of time to trek through the fields, and don’t forget to partake in some of the fun when you’re done.

There are toys and activities for the young ones, and my son particularly liked the area where kids can jump down into hay.

And one final parting tip: bring boots, or at least runners.

I, like the corn-maze amateur I am, wore flip-flops and my feet were nearly black after all was said and done.

The Cloverdale attraction is among the last three "big ones" in the region, says operator Mike Bose, along with one in Chilliwack and another in Pitt Meadows.

All three debuted at the turn of the century, when several more were in operation locally.

"For those other ones, the ones no longer open, the corn was grown only to make the maze," Bose told the Now last year.

"People who come to a farm like this to participate in agri-tourism, they want it to be real – corn for harvest. That’s the case for us and the other two."

The Bose Corn Maze is located at 64th Avenue and 156th Street in Surrey.

Visit Bosecornmaze.com for hours of operation and ticket pricing.

areid@thenownewspaper.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

B.C. families financially affected by pandemic eligible for grocery gift cards

Program open to struggling families in Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley communities

‘Each step is a prayer’: Ojibwe man will walk from Hope to Vancouver Island for Indigenous healing, reconciliation

James Taylor departs Sept. 20, returns to Saanich in five days for sacred fire

Surrey school district proposing 13 new schools in the next decade

Staff suggest new designs for future builds to maximize school space

Two Surrey schools report COVID-19 exposures, including second contact for Panorama Ridge

Fraser Health has created a new webpage listing COVID-19 cases in schools

QUIZ: A celebration of apples

September is the start of the apple harvest

VIDEO: Shots fired outside Langley gas station that was scene of 2018 homicide

No reports of injuries in Saturday evening incident

B.C. migrant, undocumented workers rally for permanent residency program

Rally is part of the Amnesty for Undocumented Workers Campaign led by the Migrant Workers Centre

Preparations underway for pandemic election in Saskatchewan and maybe B.C.

Administrators in B.C. and around the country are also looking to expand voting by mail during the pandemic

Nearly 20 per cent of COVID-19 infections among health-care workers by late July

WHO acknowledged the possibility that COVID-19 might be spread in the air under certain conditions

Ferry riders say lower fares are what’s most needed to improve service

Provincial government announces findings of public engagement process

Air quality advisory ends for the Lower Mainland

It had been in effect since Sept. 8

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

The court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington

Emaciated grizzly found dead on central B.C. coast as low salmon count sparks concern

Grizzly was found on Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw territory in Smith Inlet, 60K north of Port Hardy

Most Read