New art gallery brings life to street

NEWTON – One man’s detritus fills a storefront space on 137th Street, and people are pretty excited about it.Dirt-stained passports, rusted tools, a battered real estate sign, an embalmed deer head – all there for the viewing as part of "Gross Density Parcel," an exhibit pulled together with great speed for the opening of AgentC Gallery Thursday evening (July 23).The new "pop-up" gallery is devoted to the kind of contemporary art that excites some and may puzzle others."This is exactly what we’ve wanted to see in Newton for a very long time," said Jude Hannah, a founder of the community group ReNewton, at the exhibit opening."This street has such potential, and this is just fabulous – a wonderful art space, some amazing art."For "Gross Density Parcel," 10 artists sifted through a small mountain of debris at a vacant lot in White Rock, resulting in an intriguing mix of sculptures, films, photographs and multimedia works curated by Debbie Westergaard Tuepah and Rhys Edwards, the AgentC Projects leads.The artists began visiting the site back in March, said Polly Gibbons, a South Surrey-based artist."It was like an archeological dig trying to find out about this one man’s life, and it kept raising more questions," Gibbons said. "Like, what happened here? Why is this man’s passport and cancelled cheques in the ground? Why are the (photographic) slides of his children buried in the earth? It was quite exciting."Artist Carlyn Yandle made a giant "Charm Bracelet" from rusted bed springs and assorted old tools, including a machete, saw, grinder and wood plane.The exhibit curators first met with City of Surrey officials about six weeks ago."It was all kind of a perfect storm, with the support of the city, a great group of artists, the curators," Tuepah said.The city will pay close to $11,000 for the lease, insurance and marketing of the galleryspace over the next six months, according to Sheila McKinnon, Surrey’s manager of arts services, with additional funding possible in the next budget."The city," added Tuepah, "has been open-minded enough and forward-thinking enough to understand what kind of impact culture has on a community – particularly a community like this that has had some negative things happen over the past year or so. I think culture really has the ability to transform an area like this."In a related project, as part of Surrey’s "cultural corridor" concept, nearby storefront windows will soon be transformed with art installations, Coun. Judy Villeneuve told the Now."I’m very thrilled about it because these are all local artists with a gallery to now call their own," Villeneuve said."Gross Density Parcel" is on view until Oct. 1 at the gallery, located on 137th Street just south of 72A Avenue. More details can be found at Agentcprojects.com.

Just Posted

Surrey Community Leader Awards winners revealed

The 16th CLA awards, presented by the Now-Leader, recognized Surrey’s un-sung heroes

COMMUTER ALERT: Serious pedestrian crash closes Pacific Highway

Traffic along 176th Street, 4th to 8th Avenue, is blocked while Mounties continue to investigate.

MPs meet with Surrey council to discuss RCMP, LRT

Federal government to have quarterly meetings with Surrey

Hogg curious if a new recreation centre is needed in Grandview Heights

South Surrey-White Rock MP to host a Town Hall Meeting tonight

Surrey building that has gathered dust for 20 years is for sale again, with bids sought

Potential sale of the long-vacant 104 Avenue Centre is good news, Surrey Board of Trade CEO says

People flocking to Vancouver Island city to see hundreds of sea lions

Each year the combination of Steller and California sea lions take over Cowichan Bay

Protesters confront Environment Minister in B.C.

Protesters wanting more for killer whales confront Catherine McKenna

Humans reshaping evolutionary history of species around the globe: paper

University of British Columbia researcher had the paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society

Toronto ‘carding’ activist Desmond Cole stopped by police in Vancouver

Cole says his experience reveals what daily life is like for black and Indigenous residents

Tubing, skating, light display part of new winter festival in Vancouver

Set to open Nov. 23, the six-week festival will take over Vancouver’s Concord Pacific Centre

Commercial trucks banned from left lane of Coquihalla

B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation has introduced a new program that hopes to prevent accidents and closures on the Coquihalla Highway.

B.C. on track to record same number of overdose deaths as last year

128 people died of overdoses in September, bringing the total to more than 1,100 so far in 2018

B.C. firefighters rescue horse stuck in mud

‘It happens more often than you’d think,’ says deputy chief

Regulatory confusion over ‘toxic’ stink near Abbotsford school

Officials sniffing out which regulators responsible for enforcing compliance at neighbouring property

Most Read