Summer fun spikes with beach volleyball

SOUTH SURREY – Summer is here and it’s time to get out and enjoy this special time of the year. Over the next three months the Now will offer you some unique sporting ways to experience summer without leaving town.

When the masses storm the beaches in July and August, the most common sport being played is volleyball.

Whether it’s just a game of pepper between two people or a competitive match, there’s not an activity more enjoyable in the sand.

However, there aren’t too Summer fun spikes with beach volleyball

Summer is here and it’s time to get out and enjoy this special time of the year. Over the next three months the Now will offer you some unique sporting ways to experience summer without leaving town.

SOUTH SURREY – When the masses storm the beaches in July and August, the most common sport being played is volleyball.

Whether it’s just a game of pepper between two people or a competitive match, there’s not an activity more enjoyable in the sand.

However, there aren’t too many options for Surrey, White Rock and North Delta residents to participate in the sport due to the lack of courts.

There are a couple at South Surrey Athletic Park and one along Crescent Road.

Also finding a group large to play can be tricky.

Fortunately, Sideout Beach has come to the rescue for those looking to bump, set and spike in the sunshine.

Sideout, founded by Mischa Harris and Kyra Iannone in 2008, is dedicated to bringing

introduction and competitive training in beach volleyball to Metro Vancouver.

One of the coaches at Sideout is Tori Trim – a member of the Douglas College women’s

volleyball team and a Clayton Heights Secondary graduate.

Trim is in her second year with the beach volleyball club and has discovered she enjoys playing on the beach more than playing in a gymnasium.

“It’s kind of more relaxed in a way, but I like the idea of a partnership.

“The one downside to beach (volleyball) is that it’s more of a mental game than what indoor is because you have to really focus on what you’re doing,” she said. “You don’t want to mess up because there are only two of you.”

Trim plays libero (only along the backline) for her college team and believes that playing outdoors requires a little more strategy. “There’s a lot more court to fill and a different game plans because there are only two people there,” said Trim.

Sideout has become wellknown to the Canadian volleyball community and has started to gain recognition as a few of its members have competed for Team Canada and at the world championships.

Tmany options for Surrey, White Rock and North Delta residents to participate in the sport due to the lack of courts.

There are a couple at South Surrey Athletic Park and one along Crescent Road.

Also finding a group large to play can be tricky.

Fortunately, Sideout Beach has come to the rescue for those looking to bump, set and spike in the sunshine.

Sideout, founded by Mischa Harris and Kyra Iannone in 2008, is dedicated to bringing introduction and competitive training in beach volleyball to Metro Vancouver.

One of the coaches at Sideout is Tori Trim – a member of the Douglas College women’s volleyball team and a Clayton Heights Secondary graduate.

Trim is in her second year with the beach volleyball club and has discovered she enjoys playing on the beach more than playing in a gymnasium.

“It’s kind of more relaxed in a way, but I like the idea of a partnership.

“The one downside to beach (volleyball) is that it’s more of a mental game than what indoor is because you have to really focus on what you’re doing,” she said. “You don’t want to mess up because there are only two of you.”

Trim plays libero (only along the backline) for her college team and believes that playing outdoors requires a little more strategy.

“There’s a lot more court to fill and a different game plans because there are only two people there,” said Trim.

Sideout has become wellknown to the Canadian volleyball community and has started to gain recognition as a few of its members have competed for Team Canada and at the world championships.

The club offers a few levels of training for a range of ages.

The “excite” level is for children 12 and under who are looking to start playing volleyball and want to learn the basic skills.

“Inspire” is for ages 13 to 17 looking to improve their skills with the opportunity to participate in local tournaments.

The “compete” level is for the same ages as the inspire level, but is for athletes looking to compete at the provincial and national levels.

Like compete and inspire, perform is for high school students. They’re looking to play at the highest level and are expected to medal at the provincial and national championships.

The last level is called “integrate.” It’s built for athletes ages 19 and up looking to compete at the collegiate level.

Trim said that there aren’t too many options available in Surrey for adults looking to start playing.

Volleyball BC does offer clinics, leagues and tournaments for adults looking to play.

More information can be found at sideoutbeach.ca and volleyballbc.org.

Getting Started im plays libero (only along the backline) for her college team and believes that playing outdoors requires a little more strategy.

“There’s a lot more court to fill and a different game plans because there are only two people there,” said Trim.

Sideout has become wellknown to the Canadian volleyball community and has started to

gain recognition as a few of its members have competed for Team Canada and at the world championships.

The club offers a few levels of training for a range of ages.

The “excite” level is for children 12 and under who are looking to start playing volleyball and want to the ball during a drill at her Sideout Beach practice on Monday at South Surrey Athletic Park. (Photo: KYLE BENNING)learn the basic skills.

“Inspire”The Gear Of course the key ingredient to play volleyball would be the ball itself. They can be bought at most sporting good stores starting at $15.

The beach courts in South Surrey and White Rock keep the nets up so anyone can jump on the court and play.

However, determining the boundary line is difficult without rope or string around the court’s perimeter.

With the temperatures rising and the sun in the sky, Trim says that there are three volleyball essentials: a water bottle, sunscreen and sunglasses.

Where to go There are a couple of courts at South Surrey Athletic Park. The court is located at 14600 20th Avenue beside Semiahmoo Secondary.

There is also a court known as “The Dunn’s” near Elgin Heritage Park. It can be found at 13872 Crescent Road.

The nets stay up all the time at these locations, which make it easy to find pickup games for anyone looking to play.

kyle.benning@gmail.com

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