Shreddie

Surrey’s new digs for dogs (and cats, rats, etc.)

Surrey Animal Resource Centre takes over shelter and pound services for the city.

At six years old and nearly 20 pounds overweight, Shreddie needs someone willing to help get him into shape.

Gracie, a female black shepherd-heeler cross is great with people, but not so great with other dogs and will require an owner who is willing to spend plenty of time with her one-on-one and not at an off-leash dog park.

Like many animals currently being housed at Surrey’s new Surrey Animal Resource Centre in Cloverdale, both dogs require special attention, but in return, are willing to become special companions.

The new shelter – formerly the Surrey animal shelter or pound – is located at 17910 Colebrook Rd. and officially opens its doors in September. The centre has the ability to deal with all domestic- and farm animal-related issues in the city, including aggressive dogs, dogs off-leash or animals on the loose, and injured animals.

The new 8,400-sq.-ft. brightly lit facility has 19 kennels for canines, with an extra six isolation kennels for sick or aggressive animals. The number of cats cared for averages about 100 per month, but that can vary throughout the year.

The centre also has an animal bathing area, laundry facilities, and a clinic to deal with medical issues.

All dogs that come to the centre are evaluated on an individual basis. Many dogs that are brought in have some sort of identification that allows the staff to reunite pet and owner relatively quickly, however according to Animal Care and Control Manager Kim Marosevich, cats are still a major issue in the city.

“We have very few dogs up for adoption, due to a very high return-to-owner rate,” said Marosevich as she tries to corral six kittens currently housed in her office for socialization purposes.

But even with a city bylaw requiring cat owners to spay or neuter any outside cat over six months old, the shelter struggles with numbers of cats and kittens.

“Often we are unable to take more cats,” she said, instead offering help finding homes for the felines or suggesting owners spay or neuter the pet to make it more appealing or easier to keep at home.

The new centre has the ability to house a variety of animals, from rats, birds, and guinea pigs, to rabbits and farm animals, which are kept in the large red barn at the back of the property.

When a dog or cat is brought into the centre, assuming it is healthy, spayed or neutered, and has no medical issues, they can be available for adoption after seven days. If they are not spayed or neutered or have some medical or behaviour modification issues, the adoption availability time can be slightly longer.

The average length of stay for dogs is 10 days, and for the cats it’s about 30 days.

All dogs and cats are spayed or neutered, microchipped and tattooed before they are offered for adoption.

The adoption costs run from $80-$250 depending on the age of the animal.

For more information about adopting an animal from the shelter or to report a lost animal, call 604-574-6622.

To make an animal-related complaint, call 604-591-4370.

For more information, visit http://www.surrey.ca/city-services/11182.aspx

 

BC SPCA’s Surrey shelter is on the move

After the City of Surrey ended its kenneling contract with the BC SPCA last year, the shelter located on 152 Street near 67 Avenue closed down.

But plans are underway to create a new centre of excellence for animal welfare on a 5.5-acre parcel of land the society has purchased at 16748 50 Ave.

According to the BC SPCA website, “the centre will be the site of leading-edge programs and services to promote the BC SPCA’s mission to protect and enhance the quality of life for domestic, farm and wild animals in British Columbia.”

The facility will house cruelty investigations staff from across the region and will serve as an education centre and an adoption facility.

Until the new Surrey branch opens, for issues regarding animal welfare, phone the BC SPCA call centre at 1-855-622-7722

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