Mike Bose, operator of the Bose Corn Maze in Cloverdale. (Photo: Amy Reid)

VIDEO: Cloverdale’s corn maze is ‘Canada’s largest piece of art’

Bose Corn Maze attraction has almost 1 million corn stalks

Can you picture a million stalks of corn?

The Bose Corn Maze, open for its 18th season, boasts nearly that.

“The field is 25 acres, the maze covers about 18 acres of that 25,” said operator Mike Bose.

“We don’t know how many kilometres of trail but there’s a lot. It takes, on average, between 60 and 75 minutes to complete. People love playing on the playground, and having a picnic under the tents.

“It’s like our baby’s all grown up,” Bose said of this year’s 18-year anniversary. “We’re down to just the two of us, Chilliwack and us… the last two years were really tough for all of us with the weather. So we’ll see how long we can go. I wanted to make 20 at least.”

So does it feel like 20 years?

“Oh ya,” Bose replied without hesitation. “The tough part about doing this is it’s three months of your life you give up. We’re out here every night until between nine and 11 o’clock. We work every day. It’s a quarter of the year you just don’t get off the property.”

Bose said the maze isn’t done when planting seed, but instead, the maze is literally cut out of the cornfield when the stalks are about two inches tall.

“So we come up with a picture… and we have a designer in Utah that designs the trails to create the picture we’re after. Then we get that and we simply, two guys, and a can of spray paint go out in the field and count corn,” he explained.

“We call it Canada’s largest piece of art because it is true art. There’s no measures used, there’s no GPS, it’s literally two guys and a can of spray paint.”

This year’s maze was cut into the shape of a Canada 150 stamp.

“We always want to pick a theme that is relevant and will catch the attention of the people in the neighbourhood,” explained Bose. “And what better way thing to celebrate this year than Canada 150?”

This year’s aerial shot of the maze was taken with a drone, though in year’s past, someone goes up in a plane to get the shot.

“I remember flying over the hill the very first year we did the corn maze 18 years ago and it’s a certain feeling of satisfaction, pride, to see what you actually created in that field. I think it’s still the same. I know when we put the drone up this year to take the photo, I was impressed.”

So how tough is the Cloverdale patriotic maze this year?

“I’ve looked at the picture and I personally don’t think it’s our toughest maze,” mused Bose, explaining maze-goers have to answer trivia questions as they wind their way through, which help people decide which way to turn. “There are the usual points where if you make a wrong turn, you will be a while. This year there’s one wrong turn, and if you make it, it’s a good walk and a confusing walk to get back to where you need to be. So I think as far as mazes go it’s going to pose a challenge to people.”

The beaver is going to be a tough spot, Bose laughed.

People get lost daily.

“But we have some good young men from the neighbourhood that come and work for us and they’re always there to lend a hand.”

Why do people love corn mazes?

“I think the same reason people go on a roller coaster,” Bose said. “People go on a roller coaster because of that loss of control and that rush of adrenaline is actually good for you. I think human nature is to every once in a while, let go of control and find your way.

“Or get completely lost,” he said laughing.

So how does the man who has grown almost a million stalks of corn eat his?

“On the cob,” he said matter-of-factly. “There is only one way to eat corn isn’t there? Unless you’re putting it in a salad, it’s got to come off the cob.”

Bose said he boils his corn the eats it with no salt, no butter, “just straight.”

“If it’s any good, it’s good raw,” he added. “I actually learned that from a friend. He won’t sell corn he hasn’t tasted first. We started doing that. And corn that’s worth cooking, you better be able to eat raw and enjoy raw.”

The Bose Corn Maze at 64th Avenue on 156th Street will run until Oct. 9th.

Visit Bosecornmaze.com for hours of operation and ticket pricing.

amy.reid@surreynowleader.com

 

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