Caber, the Delta Police Department’s trauma K9, travelled to Las Vegas to help comfort the victims of the Route 91 music festival shooting in 2017. (Kim Granlich/Delta Police Department photo)

Caber, the Delta Police Department’s trauma K9, travelled to Las Vegas to help comfort the victims of the Route 91 music festival shooting in 2017. (Kim Granlich/Delta Police Department photo)

VIDEO: Delta police trauma dog retires after nine ground-breaking years of service

Caber was Canada’s first accredited justice facility dog, paving the way for dogs to support victims country-wide

After nine years on the job, Caber — the Delta Police Department’s victim services accredited facility dog — has retired from active service.

The yellow Labrador retriever was Canada’s first accredited justice facility dog, paving the way for dogs to support victims in B.C. and Canadian courtrooms.

Over the course of his career, Caber directly supported 2,132 victims of crime and trauma and responded to countless incidents including house fires, domestic violence, sexual assaults, sudden deaths, suicides and homicides. Caber was instrumental in providing support to Delta students after local tragedies including the Laura Szendrei murder in September of 2010.

“Caber’s impact is far reaching, but it is, perhaps, most felt by the individuals who he comforted,” Caber’s handler, Kim Gramlich of DPD’s victim services section, said in a press release.

“Some of our clients I think about often are the boy who could only be consoled by Caber after learning of his father’s death, or the young girl who was only able to testify against her abusers because of Caber’s unfaltering support in court.”

RELATED: Chilliwack court to decide on allowing assistance dog to sit with sex assault witness

Caber’s impact was felt beyond Delta. He and Gramlich provided integral support to Fort McMurray residents as they returned to the community after a month-long wildfire evacuation in 2016.

The team also responded to the mass shooting at the Route 91 music festival in Las Vegas in 2017. Caber was one of eight dogs that worked alongside the FBI’s office for victims assistance, providing help to victims and families in the aftermath of the tragedy that claimed the lives of 58 people.

READ MORE: Delta Police trauma dog helps Las Vegas shooting victims

“Because Caber was the first of his kind in Canada, he became known in the department and on social media as ‘The Dogfather,’” DPD Chief Neil Dubord said in a press release. “His legacy is sure to be long and lasting.”

There are now over 46 justice facility dogs working from coast to coast across Canada.

Gramlich also founded Justice Facility Dogs Canada which provides support to justice facility dog programs across the country and advocates for the continued use of these dogs in Canadian courts.

“We are so proud of Caber; he has not only been an exceptional justice facility dog, he started it all,” Laura Watamanuk, executive director of Pacific Assistance Dog Society (PADS), said in a press release.

PADS is a non-profit charity that has served the community for over 32 years, providing dogs to individuals with disabilities and to community care professionals like Gramlich. PADS bred, raised and trained Caber, who is valued at approximately $35,000, and provided him to the Delta Police Department at no charge.

“Because of Kim’s efforts — with Caber at her side — justice facility dogs can now be found in victim services agencies all across the country. They meet people on their very worst day, helping them face it with hope and a gentle friend. We look forward to following Caber’s retirement adventures, and sincerely hope his days are filled with walks, bananas and all the belly rubs he so deserves,” Watamanuk said.

In a press release, the DPD expressed its gratitude to PADS for placing Caber in the department’s program.

“Caber was the ideal dog for this difficult work. He is extremely calm and comforting. He could sit for long periods of time in a courtroom and provided unconditional affection to those he served” Gramlich said.

Caber’s good work will continue with the PADS successor dog — a two-year-old golden retriever named Puma — who joined the DPD’s ranks on Monday, Oct. 7.

During a gathering for Caber’s retirement, Gramlich removed his working cape for the last time and he was presented with several bananas and a retirement dog cake.

At the same ceremony, Dubord swore-in Puma and presented her with her DPD badge.

For more information about PADS and to watch a seven-minute video looking back over Caber’s career, visit pads.ca/caber.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Surrey farmland (File photo)
OUR VIEW: Hey Surrey, don’t squash the squashes

Clearly more respect for other peoples’ property and livelihood is in order here

White Rock's popularity as a destination places it in a difficult position in ensuring provincial health orders are followed, Coun. David Chesney said, asking that staff obtain impartial input from both Fraser Health and the Ministry of Health before further measures are debated. (File photo)
Waterfront pandemic issues vex White Rock council

Overcrowding, extra garbage the downside of take-out business

Photo collage of loved ones lost to substance use and overdose. (Photo courtesy Moms Stop The Harm)
B.C. overdose deaths still rising five years after public health emergency declared

Moms Stop the Harm calls on B.C. to provide safe supply in response to deadly illicit drug use

Traffic was tied up at the intersection of Scott and Old Yale Roads in North Surrey on Tuesday afternoon, after a semi truck hauling a load of pipes flipped while making a turn. (Shane MacKichan photos)
VIDEO: Semi hauling load of pipes flips in North Surrey intersection

Traffic near Scott and Old Yale Roads tied up by Tuesday afternoon incident

Sheila Malcolmson, B.C.’s minister of mental health and addictions (Screen shot)
Minister of mental health tells Surrey audience COVID-19 ‘has made everything worse’

More than 23,000 people in B.C. are receiving medication to treat opioid addiction

A person receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS
B.C. sees 873 more COVID-19 cases Tuesday, decline continues

Hospitalizations up to 377, two more deaths for 1,515 total

Restaurant patrons enjoy the weather on a patio in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, April 5, 2021. The province has restricted indoor dining at all restaurants in B.C. due to a spike in COVID-19 numbers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C.’s COVID-19 indoor dining, drinking ban extending into May

Restaurant association says patio rules to be clarified

Two men walk past a sign on Main Street in downtown Vancouver, B.C., Monday, April 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Calls for government transparency in COVID data continue as B.C.’s 3rd wave wears on

Social media, where both information and misinformation can spread like wildfire, has not helped

Two men were seen removing red dresses alongside the Island Highway in Oyster Bay. (Submitted photo)
Observers ‘gutted’ as pair filmed removing red dresses hung along B.C. highway

Activists hung the dresses to raise awareness for Indigenous Murdered/Missing Women & Girls

A grey whale off the coast of Vancouver Island is being monitored by Canadian and U.S. researchers, as it has developed lesions after being tagged last year. To try and prevent systemic infection from developing, the team administered antibiotics to the whale on March 31 and April 1. (Photo from the NOAA Fisheries website)
Grey whale off Vancouver Island develops lesions after being tagged, researchers monitor its condition

Canadian and U.S. whale experts administered antibiotics to the animal on March 31, April 1

Sharis Carr, a nurse at the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Service Center in Clarksdale, Miss., holds a box containing doses of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine Wednesday, April 7, 2021. The U.S. is recommending a “pause” in using the single-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine to investigate reports of potentially dangerous blood clots. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
EXPLAINER: What’s known about COVID vaccines and rare clots

These are not typical blood clots – they’re weird in two ways

Titanic was the largest and most luxurious ship in the world. Photo provided and colourized by Jiri Ferdinand.
QUIZ: How much do you know about the world’s most famous shipwreck?

Titanic sank 109 years ago today, after hitting an iceberg

In a 2019 photograph, Yin Yin Din held a picture of her brother Kyaw Naing Din, 54, and her late father Hla Din who passed away in 2014, during a trip to Victoria. (The News files)
Family of B.C. man killed by cop appeals to Attorney General for help

The Din family want B.C. Attorney General David Eby to forward their case to Crown

Most Read