Map shows Simpcw First Nation’s traditional territory extending north past McBride and east into what is now Jasper National Park. Simpcw First Nation graphic

Another B.C. First Nation voices support for Kinder Morgan pipeline

Simpcw First Nation claims people living on one-third of pipeline route support the project

The chief and council of a First Nation in B.C.’s southern interior has joined the chorus of voices supporting the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

“After seeing what’s out there in the media, council decided that it’s important we speak out,” said Simpcw Chief Nathan Matthew in a release Monday.

Simpcw First Nation, formerly known as North Thompson Indian Band, is one of the communities who have signed a Mutual Benefits Agreement with Kinder Morgan.

One-third of the pipeline traverses Simpcw territory, the release said, making it the First Nation with the greatest amount of land that the pipeline will pass, and arguably, one of the Nations who stands to be most affected by the project.

“That means one-third of the pipeline has the support of the Nation who holds Aboriginal title to the land,” Matthew said.

READ MORE: Cycle relay seeks to raise pipeline awareness

READ MORE: Chilliwack-area chief touts economic benefits of pipeline deal

The process that led to the signing of the MBA was not a simple or hasty one, he added. It took two years.

“Our job as chief and council was to do our due diligence, conduct our own environmental assessment review, and negotiate the best deal we could for the community,” he said. “After that, all of our work was presented to the community and the agreement went to a codified referendum process.”

Seventy-eight per cent of voters were in favour of executing the benefits agreement with Kinder Morgan.

“If the project does not go ahead, we will lose out on opportunities that we have been working hard at obtaining in the last year or so,” said Simpcw councillor Don Matthew.

Nathan Matthew also pointed out that John Horgan has not reached out to the Simpcw, suggesting it’s because they do not agree with the premier’s stance against the pipeline.

“First Nations ought to have a role in the discussions happening between the federal and provincial governments right now,” the chief said.

“Premier Horgan’s approach to opposing the project at this stage in the game without any discussion or involvement of Indigenous Nations affected by, and/or invested in, the project is an example of what not to do.”



newsroom@clearwatertimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Proudly Surrey modifies child-care policy

Slate wants to use school board property for child-care spaces

Surrey school board wants to expand French Immersion program

District had to close program at Cougar Creek Elementary due to low enrolment

VIDEO: Vancouver Giants earn a 3-1 victory over Everett in season-opener in Langley

Langley’s major junior hockey team opened the season at home with a victory over the Silvertips.

White Rock rail forum leads to renewed calls for relocation

Upgrading safety is not enough say local politicians

CUTENESS OVERLOAD: 2 sea otters hold hands at the Vancouver Aquarium

Holding hands is a common – and adorable – way for otters to stay safe in the water

Airline has ‘close call’ with drone while en route to B.C. airport

Jazz Aviation reported the drone sighting near Vancouver to the RCMP and Transport Canada

Tragic accident claims life of B.C. toddler

Fundraising effort has been created to help mom and family

B.C. nanny charged with sex abuse of 3 children

Saanich Police seek potential victims of Johnathon Lee Robichaud from Central Saanich

‘I’m no quitter’ on climate change issues, McKenna says at G7 ministers meeting

David Suzuki says if McKenna believes what she’s saying, she too should quit

Free vet clinic caters to pets of homeless, low income owners in Lower Mainland

The first such clinic in Langley will take place later this month.

VIDEO: Inside an eerily empty mall in Canada

Only seven of 517 retail spaces are open for business as the grand opening postponed to next year

B.C. wildfires burned large areas affected by mountain pine beetles: Experts

The mountain pine beetle epidemic affected more than 180,000 square kilometres in B.C.

Tens of thousands without power following tornado in Ottawa region

Hydro Ottawa says more than 170,000 customers were without power early this morning

Most Read