Conductors and engineers employed with CP Rail announced a strike vote authorization for April 21 late last week. Wikipedia photo.

B.C. conductors, engineers with CP Rail authorize strike action

CP Rail, Teamsters union negotiating new labour agreement that expired in December.

The union representing engineers and conductors employed with CP Rail voted to authorize strike action as early as April 21, according to an announcement made last week.

With a 94 per cent margin in favour, the strike authorization affects 3,000 members across Canada and ‘a few hundred’ in the southeast corner of BC, according to a Teamsters Canada Rail Conference spokesperson.

The last contract between the two sides expired at the end of December 2017, while a one-year ratification vote was rejected by union members in November after an initial agreement was struck a few months earlier.

The union argues that rising profits are based off cuts, layoffs, closures and working crews to the point of exhaustion, according to a press release. The union also charges that CP’s profits in 2017 reached $2.4 billion, even while sales were stagnant.

“Despite our best efforts to negotiate in good faith, we have come to a point where Teamsters are prepared to go on strike for the third time in six years to obtain a fair and reasonable contract renewal,” said Doug Finnson, President, TCRC. “We will do everything in our power to reach a negotiated settlement at CP, but one that is acceptable to our members and that addresses the major issues that exist with this employer.”

The TCRC press release accuses CP Rail of forcing train crews to be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week and pushing them to ‘work well beyond their point of exhaustion.’

CP Rail disputes that claim, in an email response by a company spokesperson.

“Contrary to what was said in the Teamsters’ press release, conductors’ and engineers’ Collective Agreements provide the ability to take 24 hours rest at home upon the completion of a train trip,” reads an emailed statement from the company.

“Furthermore, and despite what has been suggested by the Union, our engineers and conductors have many voluntary rest opportunities, as documented in their collective agreements, to ensure they get the time off they need between shifts and they are not forced to be available 24/7.”

The CP Rail statement says the company is continuing talks with the TCRC – Train & Engine, pointing to a number of successful agreements made in 2017 with unions representing the Canadian Pacific Police Association, TCRC Maintenance of Way Employees Division, and administrative and intermodal employees with the United Steelworkers Local 1976.

“Negotiations with the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference – Train & Engine, representing our Canadian engineers and conductors, continue in earnest,” according to the statement. “That said, despite our best efforts and commitment to fair, equitable and early bargaining, a significant gap remains.”

The TCRC notes that a ratification vote is currently underway for a new contract between it’s members and Canadian National, a rival competitor of CP Rail.

Last year, the company shifted 73 locomotive engineer and conductor jobs from Cranbrook to Sparwood in order to make operations more efficient.

Just Posted

The struggle for space inside Surrey’s elementary schools

SECOND IN A SERIES: A look at how overcrowding impacts student life

South Surrey Spirit Garden to host Solstice Stroll

Candlelight event to begin at 8 p.m. June 22

VIDEO: 5X Festival takes over Surrey’s Central City plaza

Second annual event draws thousands of people throughout the day

Police in North Delta nab alleged thief riding stolen bike, carrying another

Terry Lee Pipe, 43, of Surrey, has been charged with possession of property obtained by crime

Semiahmoo First Nation opens cannabis dispensary

Indigenous Bloom partners with First Nations

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

Parents of BC murder victim want personal belongings returned

Lisa Dudley’s parents, Rosemarie and Mark Surakka, were at the Mission RCMP detachment Sunday

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Pride flag taken down by Township of Langley

Woman said she was told it was removed from her front yard because of a complaint

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

Most Read