DNA testing costs dumped on cities

Surrey will have to shell out another $410,000 in its policing budget, while Delta will have to find another $96,000

Between 1995 and 2009, police had been hunting for the man who had been sexually assaulting children in Vancouver, Delta and Surrey with increasing violence.

DNA had ruled out 561 suspects.

Crime analysts narrowed down the most likely suspect to one man – Ibata Hexamer.

He was watched by police as he threw a coffee cup away, an item that proved to match DNA found on victims.

Hexamer pled guilty to the crimes.

“Had we not been called in and applied our approach to it, and they stayed with traditional policing investigative techniques on this file, we might not have caught him on the second hit, or the next, or the next,” VPD Special Const. Ryan Prox said in a book titled Eliminatiing Crime. “And he was escalating, he was probably going to kill next… “

It’s just one instance of how effective – and important – DNA testing is to modern policing.

Municipalities just found out the province-federal government police funding agreement will see DNA lab costs downloaded to local government.

For Surrey, it will cost more than $400,000 per year and in Delta, the lab costs are $96,000.

Surrey Coun. Bruce Hayne said it’s another hit to a city that just hired another 100 police officers.

“So these kinds of additional costs are certainly unwelcome,” said Hayne, who understands the downloading is being initiated by the federal government. “Municipalities have never paid for it (DNA testing) before, up until this point.”

He equated the costs to provincial fire fighting in that it’s unpredictable and must be paid for regardless.

“We need to give all the tools necessary to the RCMP to do their job,” Hayne said.

The approaching downloading has been coming for a while.

In February, 2014, then mayor Dianne Watts sent a letter to former Conservative Minister of Public Safety Steven Blaney asking that he reverse plans to download DNA costs to local government.

“It is not appropriate for Public Safety Canada to make assertions about service reductions when service delivery is the responsibility of the RCMP and when the Province is constitutionally responsible for ensuring adequate and effective policing,”  Watts and UBCM president Rhona Martin wrote to Blaney.

Haynes said the issue will be going to the Union of B.C. Municipalities again and will be a subject of regional policing talks with Surrey Mayor Linda Hepner.

 

Surrey North Delta Leader

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

UPDATE: Missing man found

‘Family and police are concerned for his wellbeing at this time’

Police investigating shooting in North Delta

Police say occupants of two vehicles exchanged gunfire near 120th Street and 82nd Avenue

TransLink CEO asks riders not to enforce mask rules after Surrey bus punch-up

A fight broke out on a bus at 96 Avenue and Scott Road involving a man who refused to wear a mask

Defence in Fraser Valley chicken abuse cases asks BC Supreme Court to drop the charges

Sofina Foods and Chilliwack company say undercover video by ‘vigilante group’ violates Charter rights

Surrey’s Johnston Heights reporting COVID-19 exposure

Fraser Health has created a new webpage listing COVID-19 cases in schools

Weekend sees 267 cases, 3 deaths in B.C.; Dr. Henry says events leading to COVID spread

There are currently 1,302 active cases in B.C., while 3,372 people are under public health monitoring

Lightning strike: Tampa Bay blanks Dallas 2-0 to win Stanley Cup

Hedman wins Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP

Liberals seek to fast track new COVID-19 aid bill after CERB expires

Government secured NDP support for legislation by hiking amount of benefits by $100 to $500 per week

B.C. VOTES 2020: Echoes of HST in B.C. debate over sales tax

Cannabis, tobacco, luxury cars still taxed in B.C. Liberal plan

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

She warned her son about toxic drugs, then he was dead

Donna Bridgman’s son died at the age of 38 in Vancouver

B.C. food and beverage producers set record sales in 2019

Farmed salmon again leads international exports

Most Read