‘Falconridge rapist’ deemed long-term offender

Surrey man sentenced to four years jail for Langley carjacking, followed by 10 years strict community supervision.

Andrew Aurie Jefferson has been designated a long-term offender by a B.C. Provincial Court judge.

A convicted rapist living in Surrey has been designated a long-term offender by a B.C. Provincial Court judge, meaning he will be strictly monitored for a decade following his jail term.

Andrew Aurie Jefferson, 29, was in court Friday morning to face sentencing for a June 2013 violent carjacking in Langley. But due to his criminal history, Crown prosecutors also wanted Jefferson deemed a long-term offender – status sought when a felon is likely to re-offend and puts the community at risk.

Judge Michael Hicks sentenced Jefferson to four years in jail for the Langley carjacking, for which Jefferson pled guilty to robbery in January. In that incident, a woman was in a parking lot heading for her car when Jefferson, high on cocaine, approached her from behind and said, “You are being stabbed. I am taking your car.”

He pointed a small, dull-bladed knife into her stomach, the court heard, and when she dropped her keys, Jefferson grabbed them, got in her car and sped off. A witness called 911 and police apprehended him shortly after. He’s been in prison since.

Hicks said the victim suffers long-term impacts from the attack, including anxiety, loss of sleep, heightened fear and suspiciousness of others.

With credit for the 497 days Jefferson has been in custody for that crime, about two years, seven months remain of the four-year sentence.

The judge then addressed Jefferson’s lengthy and violent criminal past to assess his future risk.

While he had numerous weapons and theft offences as a youth, it was in 2006, when he was 22, that he committed his most heinous crimes. It was then that he terrorized a Calgary neighbourhood called Falconridge, violently raping two women and attempting to rape a third. Jefferson was dubbed the “Falconridge rapist.”

He served six-and-a-half years in jail before being released on probation in 2011 to live in Surrey, with a public warning that he was an “untreated sex offender.”

In 2012, he was charged with sexually assaulting a teen in Surrey, but found not guilty earlier this year.

In court in August, Jefferson apologized for his crimes and vowed he was turning his life around, having steered clear of drugs of late and completed a violence prevention program.

But on Friday, Judge Hicks said Jefferson still has a long way to go.

“There is a substantial risk that Mr. Jefferson will re-offend,” he said, saying he “must” be designated a long-term offender.

The purpose of the sentence was not intended to penalize Jefferson, said the judge, but to provide adequate support so he may eventually be rehabilitated.

Long-term offender status differs from dangerous offender status in that a long-term offender faces strict community supervision for a maximum of 10 years, while a dangerous offender may be sentenced to an indefinite prison term.

The extra designations can be applied for by prosecutors during sentencing. Such an application was not made in the case of convicted rapist Raymond Caissie, who served his time and was living in Surrey when he was charged with murdering 17-year-old Serena Vermeersch last month.

– with files from Monique Tamminga

Surrey North Delta Leader

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

OBITUARY: Sherrold Haddad brought giant Canadian flag to Surrey car dealership, built community

‘An amazing man, business person and community leader,’ friend Bruce Hayne posted to Facebook

COVID-19: Daily update on the pandemic in Surrey, White Rock, Delta and beyond

MARCH 28: Delta council passes bylaw to fine people who don’t socially distance

White Rock council members stand by decision to close pier

Minimal push-back over closure to minimize chance of spreading COVID-19 virus

B.C. is seeing the highest rate of COVID-19 recovery in Canada, and there’s a few reasons why

British Columbia was one of the first to see rise in COVID-19 cases, and has also switched up testing

B.C. Ferries passengers staying away, as asked, during COVID-19 pandemic

Ferry corporation says ridership down 70-80 per cent over the last week and a half

Sewers stitch masks to free up supplies for front-line health-care workers

“We have little old ladies sewing up a storm,” said Joan Davis

Experts weigh in on best handling of groceries during COVID-19 pandemic

Study suggests the virus can live for up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to three days on plastic

COVID-19 world update: Enforceable quarantine in NYC?; France orders 1 billion masks

Spain warns EU’s future at stake; New York governor calls Trump’s idea ‘federal declaration of war

Blue ribbons popping up along streets in Abbotsford in praise of B.C. healthcare workers

Healthcare worker’s family starts local trend of morale support

Earth Hour 2020 kicks off online Saturday night

Action moves online due to COVID-19

B.C. COVID-19 cases rise 92 to 884, one more death, 81 in care

Outbreak action underway in 12 long-term care homes

B.C. veterinarians want to smooth the fur of COVID-19-worried pet owners

Vets expect to continue giving your fur buddies the help they need while social distancing

Most Read