Pattullo turns 75

A gleaming, brand-spanking new Pattullo Bridge officially opened Nov. 15, 1937 with a great deal of fanfare about how modern it was.

The Pattullo Bridge will celebrate the 75th anniversary of its opening on Nov. 15.

A gleaming, brand-spanking new Pattullo Bridge officially opened Nov. 15, 1937 with a great deal of fanfare about how modern it was. The ceremony’s official souvenir program bragged the span was “planned not only to meet all requirements of today but to anticipate traffic expansion for years to come.”

Seventy-five years later the weathered and rusted structure soldiers on, although “years to come” ran out decades ago.

The connection across the Fraser River between Surrey and New Westminster was well used long before the first rivet was drilled on the Pattullo. The first crossings were done by the K de K and Surrey ferries. In 1904, a wooden bridge was completed that carried trains on one level and carts, pedestrians, produce, horses, cattle, and assorted farm animals on another.

Then along came the motor vehicle, and the bridge quickly became obsolete because it was too narrow for two to pass each other. A paddle had to be passed back and forth from one end of the bridge to another to indicate if the bridge was occupied or not.

It was, however, the only physical crossing west of Mission, with ferries patrolling up and down the river taking people across.

Little New Deal

Spending money to build a bridge during The Great Depression would seem like political suicide these days. But when Premier Thomas Dufferin (Duff) Pattullo took charge of the province in the 1930s, his solution was to emulate U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal with a Little New Deal, says local historian Archie Miller of A Sense of History research services.

“He believed in getting involved in helping people, and took to heart what had to be done to help people,” says Miller.

Pattullo proposed a health insurance scheme, a higher minimum wage, more money for schools, measures to ease the plight of the poor and unemployed, and the building of public works projects such as a big bridge named after him.

There was a lot of discussion about where to put it. There was some talk of connecting right into Downtown New Westminster or down river where the George Massey Tunnel is now.

There were also discussions about it being bigger, possibly six or eight lanes, says Miller. The reaction when that was suggested, he says, was “My God, what are you thinking? Never in our history will you see enough cars.”

Eventually the decision was made to go ahead at one of the narrowest spots on the Fraser. Construction began in September 1935. The province bought 10 properties on the New Westminster side to make it happen.

Ceremonial celebration

It took two years and two months to build at a cost of $4 million—big bucks in those days. To pay for it, users were charged a toll that wasn’t removed until 1952.

Finally getting a crossing that spanned the waterway that divided the region was a big deal back then, and something to celebrate. A beautiful eight-page official souvenir program was produced for the opening ceremonies and a fancy three-course luncheon was served at Queen’s Park Arena. The bridge not only connected Fraser Valley farmers to their markets, but also was an important link to the financial heart of B.C. in downtown Vancouver with McBride Boulevard, 10th Avenue, and Kingsway being the province’s official highway before the freeway was built in the 1960s.

“It does allow people to get into Burnaby, New Westminster and Vancouver. And people can now go the other way,” says Miller.

Following the Second World War in the late 1940s and into the 1950s, the economy improved dramatically and the Pattullo proved its worth.

“As soon as the war is over you now have quite a boom in gas and cars, “says Miller. “The bridge begins to pay its dividends because then it becomes easy to nip across.

Narrow lanes, close calls

As the years go by, other crossings were built like the Port Mann, Queensborough, Alex Fraser, Knight Street, Oak Street and Arthur Laing bridges, and the Massey tunnel. And as the years went by, vehicles got wider and wider, and the gap between side view mirrors got narrower and narrower. For drivers, the trip across the Pattullo became scarier. During the ’90s and into this century the span became notorious because of all the fatal accidents, forcing authorities to close the inside lanes overnight to reduce the death toll.

As the 75th anniversary of Duff Pattullo cutting the ribbon on the state-of-the-art bridge neared, TransLink, which is responsible for the Pattullo, announced the structure is in trouble. The deck, girders, and structural components show signs of corrosion and deterioration. A 2007 report to TransLink determined the bridge is vulnerable to collapse even if there’s only a moderate earthquake.

As any white-knuckled driver going over the bridge knows, the Pattullo’s lanes are too narrow for today’s vehicles while the sidewalk leaves pedestrians and cyclists unprotected from traffic. TransLink says there’s an average of 138 accidents a year on the span.

There’s also a fear the bridge’s foundations could be exposed to the Fraser’s fast flow that removes sand and rocks from around the bridge piers, and its foundation is having issues caused by river scour.

Earlier this year, TransLink proposed a six-lane replacement for the bridge at a cost of up to $1 billion. New Westminster council and residents complained this would drive more traffic into their already congested city. Last week, TransLink said it will be doing a new assessment to determine if it’s possible to extend the Pattullo’s life by a couple more decades with safety and seismic upgrades. If that was done, the bridge would be reduced to three lanes.

TransLink executive vice-president for strategic planning Bob Paddon told Black Press the bridge is safe and closure is “extremely unlikely,” but conditions could make it necessary.

While New Westminster Mayor Wayne Wright was glad TransLink was listening to its concerns, Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts said the Pattullo must be replaced.

The fanfare over the Pattullo has long since faded, the big question now is whether it’s had its last hurrah.

Surrey North Delta Leader

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Semi and BMW collide on South Surrey highway

At least one person to hospital, both vehicles sustained significant damage

East White Rock crosswalk, speed bumps proposed

Report on costs and implications requested by council

White Rock dogs-on-promenade survey shows majority approval

City figures suggest that off-season program could continue

UPDATE: Pedestrian dies after being hit by bus in uptown White Rock

Collision occurred July 3 at North Bluff Road and Johnston Road

Intent of killing at centre of Surrey man’s West Kelowna murder trial

B.C. Supreme Court Justice Allison Beames is anticipated to return with her decision in August

QUIZ: A celebration of dogs

These are the dog days of summer. How much do you know about dogs?

Family and friends mark birthday of teen who died after being discovered in Langley park

Carson Crimeni suffered an apparent drug overdose, his final moments broadcast on social media

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

Langley vigil demands justice for Ontario animal activist killed protesting slaughterhouse

More than two dozen people gathered at Britco Pork to remember Regan Russell, and fight Bill 156

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Most Read