Dr. Len Vu, a general surgeon at Langley Memorial Hospital, demonstrated the use of an electronic reporting system recently implemented at LMH. Langley’s hospital is the first in the Fraser Health Authority to use this system, which is expected to improve patient care and lead to cost savings. Troy Landreville Langley Times

Picture this: endoscopy innovation being rolled out across Fraser Health region

Langley Memorial first hospital in Fraser Health region to use system

This medical innovation, says surgeon Scott Cowie, is a game changer.

An electronic reporting system implemented at Langley Memorial Hospital now allows endoscopists (surgeons who perform colonoscopies/gastroscopies) to record images and create synoptic reports, and share these with other physicians throughout the Fraser Health region instantaneously.

Fraser Health is the first region in the province to implement such a system.

“It’s like a network that records the images you are taking from the patient,” Cowie said.

“And also, you create the report about the patient in that system rather than dictating them.”

The report is sent from the computer network from the endoscopy unit to the network for the entire Fraser Health region, and it is also shipped out electronically to all the referring physicians.

Cowie has been the physician champion for this project for about four years and LMH is the first site in the region to use the system.

“Our local site executive director was a strong advocate to help LMH move ahead in this,” said Cowie, who has been a surgeon at Langley’s hospital for the past 10 years.

“I think this may stand in counterbalance perhaps to the checkered roll-outs of EMR systems elsewhere in the province recently.”

LMH’s endoscopy unit is a busy service which offers 24-hour care to patients, and performed 11 per cent of the all screening colonoscopies for the region last year, including specifically identified high risk patients.

“This system will help us improve patient care and provide cost savings,” Cowie said.

“I think it’s a game-changer for a lot of reasons. It’s cost effective. It’s saving the health care system money because we’re cutting back on using expensive photo paper. That seems like a small thing, but it’s actually really expensive to print images out, which we had to do for quality purposes, so now it’s electronically captured, so that saves a fair bit of money.”

Cowie said a crucial element is the ease in which information can be shared.

“Fraser Health is a big region, geographically,” Cowie said. “There are about 70 physicians doing endoscopy across the region at different sites, and they all share information to each other about patients. For example, if I’m doing a scope here (at LMH) and that patient needs another procedure in the near future or three years from now, what I capture and see here wasn’t easily available for somebody, say, in Abbotsford.”

In past, at the very best, physicians at other hospitals would be delivered a grainy, black-and-white image that Cowie described as “hardly useful at all.”

“But with this system, because we plan to put it out at every site in the region, they will be able to see images exactly as I see them,” he added. “Instantaneously, too, so there’s no lag in seeing it.”

Quality metrics is also a key, Cowie noted.

“We’re really focused on looking at outcomes for patients,” Cowie explained. “We’re doing, like, 4,650 surgeries (at LMH) a year, and (the) Fraser Health (region), we’re doing about 45,000 procedures like this a year. These are high-volume things so we want to make sure everything is being done properly and achieving the outcomes you want to get. There’s very specific quality measures.”

In the broader picture, the system “is going to make everybody’s job a lot easier,” Cowie said. “In the immediacy of actually using it, it’s as easy as what we did before, so it’s value added.”

The system is being rolled out across the region, starting at Surrey Memorial and then, on a monthly basis, to all of the other Fraser Health hospitals, including Royal Columbian, Eagleridge, and Burnaby.

 

Dr. Scott Cowie and Dr. Len Vu from Langley Memorial Hospital are promoting an electronic reporting system that allows endoscopists to record images and create synoptic reports, and share these with other physicians throughout the Fraser Health region instantaneously. Troy Landreville Langley Times

Just Posted

Surrey business groups dig in heels on LRT

Mayor-elect Doug McCallum and his coalition aim to cancel LRT in favour of extending SkyTrain

New faces on Surrey council: Who they are and how they got here

The council includes seven of eight candidates who ran with Doug McCallum-led Safe Surrey Coalition

UPDATE: Missing Surrey girl, 15, located

Surrey RCMP sought help to locate Hailey McClelland

Surrey’s mayor-elect McCallum has big promises to keep

From estimated 337, 289 eligible voters in Surrey, 109,791 votes were cast for 32.5 per cent turnout

Dancing zombies expected in droves at Surrey’s ‘Thrill the World’ event

Michael Jackson’s iconic video inspires group-dance gatherings around the globe

B.C. sailor surprised by humpback whale playing under her boat

Jodi Klahm-Kozicki said the experience was ‘magical’ near Denman Island

Vancouver mayoral hopefuly admits defeat, congratulates winner Kennedy Stewart

Ken Sim of the Non-Partisan Association apologized for the time it took to acknowledge Stewart won

Mental fitness questioned of man charged in Chilliwack River Valley shooting

Peter Kampos told his lawyer ‘his dreams are being stolen and turned into drugs’ at Surrey Pre-trial

Fraser Valley mom stuck in Africa over adoption delay

Kim and Clark Moran have been waiting four weeks to bring son home

B.C. government moves to tighten resource industry regulations

New superintendent will oversee engineers, biologists, foresters

Election watchdog seeks digitally savvy specialists to zero in on threats

Move follows troublesome evidence of online Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election

More court before Dutch man charged in Amanda Todd case is extradited here

Appeals must be dealt with in Europe, before charges faced in B.C.

Most Read