Dion Buhler leads, Trish Buhler, Jerry Giles and Maureen Giles head up Owlhead on their snowmobiles. A proposed District of Sicamous off-road vehicle bylaw, if approved, would make it possible for people on sleds and ATVs to use designated municipal roads to access local trailheads. File photo

Dion Buhler leads, Trish Buhler, Jerry Giles and Maureen Giles head up Owlhead on their snowmobiles. A proposed District of Sicamous off-road vehicle bylaw, if approved, would make it possible for people on sleds and ATVs to use designated municipal roads to access local trailheads. File photo

Proposed snowmobiles along Sicamous roads concern RCMP

RCMP, ICBC and province not yet on-board with proposed off-road bylaw in the B.C. Interior

Some significant hurdles remain in the way of Sicamous’ proposed off-road vehicle bylaw.

The public got a chance to view the most current draft of the bylaw during a Nov. 28 open house hosted by the District of Sicamous. Coun. Gord Bushell said more than 200 people attended and, of them, only four expressed concerns. He said the rest were “overwhelmingly in favour,” adding similar feedback has been received through an online survey.

While the bylaw remains a work in progress, the goal is to allow off-road vehicle users on designated district roads to access popular off-road recreational trails, particularly Queest and Owlhead.

“It’s basically the entire town other than parks – you can drive on the streets, but it’s only to get you to the hill and back home, you can’t drive around and get groceries or go to the restaurant,” said Bushell.

The district has devised a registration system that requires those wanting to take advantage of the bylaw to purchase a permit and decal.

“You read the bylaw, you read the rules and regulations, you sign, you pay another fee for a sticker, a Sicamous sticker that goes on your licence plate,” said Bushell. “The reason we’re doing it this way is because right now our bylaw officer can’t search a Saskatchewan plate or an Alberta plate… they can only search a B.C. plate. The big part of that is the education part… it is just like a rental agreement or contract.”

Those who seek a permit will also have to be properly insured to drive on municipal roads.

Bushell likens the bylaw to a provincial pilot project launched last summer in Chase and Qualicum Beach, one that allows residents to drive golf carts along designated municipal routes. Unlike that project, however, Bushell says the province, ICBC and the RCMP are still not onboard with the off-road vehicle bylaw.

Sicamous Sgt. Murray McNeil has a number of concerns with the proposed bylaw. Regarding the pilot project in Chase, he explained that was done with support from ICBC and the province, which agreed to amend the B.C. Motor Vehicle Act to make it work. What Sicamous is proposing, however, is currently prohibited under the act.

“For this bylaw to be passed and be legal, they would have to do what Chase has done, they would have to get the province to amend Motor Vehicle Act regulations and get ICBC to agree that this is something they support, and then ICBC would then sell insurance for ATVs or snowmobiles to be operating on the street,” said McNeil, adding this is currently not occurring anywhere in B.C.

McNeil said the only legal avenue available for use of an off-road vehicle on municipal streets is a police-issued permit. This, he explained, might be sought by a business wishing to use an ATV along a certain route. He emphasized this permit is not to promote tourism. And this is another difference McNeil sees between what Chase has and what Sicamous is pursuing.

“It doesn’t really translate to a tourism thing because no one is going into Chase and Qualicum Beach trailering in their golf carts for the privilege of driving a golf cart through those communities,” said McNeil. “It’s just for local people to get around. And I think what Sicamous is proposing is a tourism-driven thing, to try to get people to come into this community with their ATVs or with their snowmobiles and drive them on the streets…”

Bushell has stated the long-term vision for the bylaw is to help grow Sicamous’ off-road vehicle industries,especially during the spring and fall.

In addition to the bylaw being in conflict with the Motor Vehicle Act, McNeil said he personally is not in favour of the proposed bylaw due to the potential for collisions in high-traffic areas.

“You start putting snowmobiles or ATVs on streets where you have cars, in a high-traffic, area there’s potential for collision, for injury and, of course, lawsuits tied to that…,” said McNeil. “The enforcement side would be difficult as well. These are vehicles that can travel at higher rates of speed and of course, they’re suited to evade police if they wanted to. A snowmobile can take off up a logging road, and so can an ATV, and it would be very difficult for police to catch up with them. Yeah, on the law enforcement side there’s lots of concern as well.”

To report a typo, email:
newstips@saobserver.net
.


@SalmonArm
newstips@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(Photo: Now-Leader).
Surrey Schools seeking community input for 2021-22 budget

Majority of it is pre-allocated, but room to address priorities in the community

An example of a Surrey Police cruiser, showcased at Mayor Doug McCallum’s State of the City Address at Civic Hotel in May of 2019. (File photo: Amy Reid)
Surrey Police Service hires first three inspectors as ‘next layer of leadership’

Three men have more than 80 years of combined experience

Whalley Chiefs general manager Paul Hargreaves in the stands at the club's diamond at Whalley Athletic Park. (Photo: Tom Zillich)
Surrey baseball clubs prep for spring games as COVID threatens another season

‘I’m really excited about this year, because we have the troops in place,’ Whalley Chiefs GM says

Scales of Justice
Court awards woman $167K after vehicle was struck by White Rock taxi in 2016

Plaintiff’s knee injuries and resulting chronic pain disability are genuine, judge rules

TEASER - SAGAís Gift Shop Manager Barbie Warwick wearing The Summons while sketching in Facing Time exhibit. Photo by Pardeep Singh.jpg
‘The Summons’ face masks created as fundraiser for Surrey Art Gallery Association

Image of magnolia flower and poetry printed on specially designed mask

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry head for the B.C. legislature press theatre to give a daily update on the COVID-19 pandemic, April 6, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. nears 300,000 COVID-19 vaccinations, essential workers next

564 new cases, four deaths, no new outbreaks Thursday

Walter Gretzky father of hockey hall-of-famer Wayne Gretzky waves to fans as the Buffalo Sabres play against the Toronto Maple Leafs during third period NHL hockey action in Toronto on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky, father of the Great One, dies at 82

Canada’s hockey dad had battled Parkinson’s disease and other health issues

Municipal Affairs Minister Josie Osborne speaks in the B.C. legislature, March 4, 2021. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals, NDP sing in harmony on local election reforms

Bill regulates paid canvassers, allows people in condo buildings

(National Emergency Management Agency)
No tsunami risk to B.C. from powerful New Zealand earthquake: officials

An 8.1 magnitude earthquake shook the north of New Zealand Thursday morning

(AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
Pandemic stress, isolation key factors as to why Canadians turned to cannabis, alcohol

Study found that isolation played key role in Canadians’ substance use

Burnaby Mounties responded to 56 complaints and issued 10 tickets to people flouting COVID-19 restrictions in February. (Patrick Davies/100 Mile Free Press)
COVID denier fined $2,300 for hosting gathering in her home: Burnaby RCMP

The woman told Mounties she does not believe the pandemic is real

Grand Forks’ Gary Smith stands in front of his Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster float. Photo: Submitted
Grand Forks’ Flying Spaghetti Monster leader still boiling over driver’s licence photo

Gary Smith, head of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster of B.C., said he has since spoken to lawyers

RCMP members responded to calls of a man-down at Landsdowne mall in Richmond Wednesday afternoon. The 40-year-old was suffering from stab wounds. (Phil McLachlan/Capital News)
Man in critical condition following afternoon attack outside Richmond mall: RCMP

The Vancouver resident was found lying injured outside Richmond’s Lansdowne Centre

Most Read