Three Surrey teachers suspended over ‘Jar of Death’ punishments

Students were dared to lick a teacher's foot, chew gum that had already been chewed.

Three Surrey teachers suspended over 'Jar of Death' punishments

Three high school teachers in Surrey have been reprimanded after they failed to intervene when students organized a “Jar of Death” punishment at a camp.

Campers were pressured to lick a teacher’s foot, chew gum that had been chewed by another teacher and drink a glass of water into which four people had spat, the B.C. commissioner for teacher regulation says in a document recently posted on its website.

Jennifer Robinson, a teacher who is in charge of the PE leadership program at a school in Surrey, was among the supervisors at the annual three-day camp last September, the document says.

Robinson, who was listed as the “educator-in-charge” at the camp, has been suspended for two days in October while two other teachers will serve their one-day suspensions in November.

The consent resolution agreement says students would nominate others who had done something at the camp that they did not like.

“The nominees had to reach into a jar and pull out a piece of paper with a task written on it which they would then be expected to perform in front of the group,” it says.

“At no time did she (Robinson) attempt to put a stop to the activity.”

Robinson also did not intervene during a so-called food challenge organized by two kids in Grade 12.

Students were required to eat food drawn randomly from a jar, including minced garlic, baby food and dried squid.

“While some students protested during the challenge, they were pressured by older students to continue to participate,” the document says, adding Robinson was present but did not intervene, saying only that the food had to be edible and could not include peanuts.

Student dared to lick teacher’s foot

Michael Mitro, another teacher at the school, was selected by a male student to be the teacher whose foot would be licked as part of the “Jar of Death” challenge.

“Mitro sat in front of students and staff, and removed his shoe and sock so that the student could then lick his foot,” says the consent resolution agreement in his case, signed by the commissioner on Aug. 11.

A third teacher, Matthew Jones, was chosen by students as the person whose gum would have to chewed by another student who was being punished.

“Jones took a piece of gum, chewed it, and gave it to the student to complete the challenge,” says the document, also signed by the commissioner on Aug. 11.

All the teachers were issued letters of discipline last December.

Under the agreement with the commissioner, the three teachers admitted that their actions constitute professional misconduct. They also agreed not to make any statement orally or in writing to contradict, dispute or call into question the admissions they have made.

The three teachers were required to complete a course on respectful professional boundaries through the Justice Institute of B.C.

The Canadian Press

Just Posted

File photo
Surrey Board of Trade vows ‘a lot of noise’ will be made about tax increases

Huberman calls for comprehensive tax review at all levels of government

William Henry Rawlison was last seen on Sunday, June 20, 2021. (Contributed photo)
Police looking for missing White Rock senior

William Rawlison, last seen on June 20, may be driving to Kamloops

TEASER PHOTO ONLY - Hillcrest Drive-In's sign at the end its run in Surrey, in a photo uploaded to cinematreasures.org by hermangotlieb.
SURREY NOW & THEN: The city’s last drive-in, Hillcrest showed movies for 50 years on site turned shopping mall

‘It was a good memory, being the last drive-in in the Lower Mainland, at the time,’ says former operator Jay Daulat

United Truckers Association members outside Labour Minister/Surrey-Newton MLA Harry Bains’ office on Monday, June 21. (submitted photo: UTA)
Protesting truckers park outside Labour Minister’s Surrey office; daily rallies promised

The truckers take issue with unlicensed trucks taking work away from legitimate owner operators, and more

Natalie Brown and Colten Wilke star in the feature film Thunderbird, co-produced by South Surrey-raised Michael Morrison and released this month in Canada, the U.S and the U.K. (Contributed photo)
South Surrey-raised producer helps bring ‘Thunderbird’ to the screen

Michael Morrison guides B.C.-shot thriller with First Nations connection

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
VIDEO: Border quarantine to soon lift for fully vaccinated Canadians

Eligible travellers must still take multiple COVID-19 tests

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross. (Photo by Peter Versteege)
BC Liberal leadership candidate condemns ‘senseless violence’ of Okanagan church fires

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross says reconciliation isn’t about revenge for past tragedies

A coroner’s inquest will be taking place at the Capitol Theatre in Port Alberni for the next week. (ELENA RARDON / ALBERNI VALLEY NEWS)
Teen B.C. mom who died following police custody recalled as ‘friend to many’

Police sent Jocelyn George to hospital after intoxication had gone ‘beyond the realm’ of normal detox

FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2020, file photo, Las Vegas Raiders defensive end Carl Nassib leaves the field after an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons in Atlanta. Nassib on Monday, June 21, 2021, became the first active NFL player to come out as gay. Nassib announced the news on Instagram, saying he was not doing it for the attention but because “I just think that representation and visibility are so important.” (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
Nassib becomes first active NFL player to come out as gay

More than a dozen NFL players have come out as gay after their careers were over

Penticton Indian Band Chief Greg Gabriel speaks to the Sacred Hearts Catholic Church burning down early Monday morning, June 21, 2021. (Monique Tamminga Western News)
Penticton band chief condemns suspicious burning of 2 Catholic churches

Both Catholic church fires are deemed suspicious, says RCMP

COVID-19 daily cases reported to B.C. public health, seven-day moving average to June 17, 2021. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections drop to 90 on Sunday, 45 Monday

Pandemic spread dwindles as 77% of adults receive vaccine

By protesting uninvited in First Nations’ territories, conservationists are acting in a neocolonial or paternalistic manner, says Huu-ay-aht Chief Robert Dennis. Photo by Heather Thomson
A closer look: do Vancouver Island First Nations support the war in the woods?

First Nations/environmentalist old growth alliance uneasy, if it exists at all

A blood drive in support of 1-year-old Rielynn Gormley of Agassiz is scheduled for Monday, June 28 at Tzeachten First Nation Community Hall in Chilliwack. Rielynn lives with type 3 von Willebrand disease, which makes it difficult for her to stop bleeding. (Screenshot/Canadian Blood Services)
Upcoming blood drive in honour of Fraser Valley toddler with rare blood condition

The Gormley family has organized a blood drive in Chilliwack on June 28

One Reconciliation Pole and two Welcome Figures were unveiled during a ceremony in honour of truth and reconciliation on National Peoples Indigenous Day at the Vancouver School District in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday, June 21, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Horgan marks Indigenous Peoples Day by urging recognition of systemic racism

National Indigenous Peoples Day has been marked in Canada since 1996

Most Read