Winnipeg police will use online video to respond to break-ins

Pilot project involves officers contacting people online when they report break-ins

Police want the public to know the reporting person is under no obligation to consent to a virtual assessment and the video will not be recorded or retained. (Winnipeg Police Service/YouTube)

Police want the public to know the reporting person is under no obligation to consent to a virtual assessment and the video will not be recorded or retained. (Winnipeg Police Service/YouTube)

Police in Winnipeg have rolled out a pilot project that will allow them to virtually respond to residential break-ins and possibly reduce the public’s wait time when reporting such crimes.

The project uses online video platforms to get in touch with homeowners.

An officer will contact people online when they report break-ins.

Homeowners will be asked for consent to do a real-time assessment of the scene to determine whether officers should be sent out.

Police say the online interaction is for assessment purposes only and will not be recorded or retained.

Police Chief Danny Smyth said the plan has a number of benefits.

“It enables people to clean up and get back to normal sooner,” he said.

“It allows us to use technology to assess the scene so that we can respond, if it’s required, with a forensic survey.”

The project comes amid mounting property crimes in Winnipeg that are partially linked to a rise in methamphetamine use. (CTV Winnipeg, CJOB)

The Canadian Press

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