BCTF using children as bargaining chips

Or is it just a coincidence the BCTF’s job action happens to coincide with the beginning of the school year?

Although I’d much prefer critiquing high-earning private and public sector CEOs, I nonetheless find it sickening the B.C. Teachers Federation’s blatant utilization of their young students as bargaining chips. Or is it just a coincidence the BCTF’s job action happens to coincide with the beginning of the school year?

But what also burns me is the union members’ gall to expect to continue receiving regular employee benefits – as well as regular pay – regardless of the fact they’re not performing many tasks that are part of their salary agreement. Meanwhile, B.C.’s politicians, both those governing and in opposition, promote the coddling so as not to make the teachers more angry.

It would be interesting to know how much of the “I support the teachers” sentiment out there is mostly out of fear of retaliation against their children by BCTF teachers.

 

Frank G. Sterle,  Jr.

 

Teachers deserve better

I am a parent of two girls in the public school system and married to a teacher who has been working 22 years educating and motivating our youth.

In response to some negative misinformed comments in letters to the editor I would like to point out a few misconceptions that some people have about teachers.

Their work day does not start at 9 a.m. and end at 3 p.m. Most teachers are at school early, leaving well past the last bell and still take marking and projects home with them. Teachers spend their own time preparing and writing report cards three times per year.

For the months of July and August teachers are on unpaid vacation. Their salary is based on the 10-month school year.

I would estimate that our personal household budget has spent well over $200 dollars per year for books and teaching supplies that are not reimbursed.  Over 22 years, that is a considerable sum of money.

Our education system is not a babysitting service. Parents and teachers should be working together.

Healthy, well-nourished and rested children are the most successful learners. If a child is sick it is the parent’s responsibility to organize care for them at home.

Teachers require a university degree plus a further year of education to work in BC.  As a group they are highly professional, motivated and tasked with educating our children who will shape our future. B.C. teachers’ salaries are among the lowest in Canada.

For our government to start trying to increase class sizes and reduce in-class support for special needs children is unbelievably short sighted and stupid.

Over crowded classrooms, portables which are substandard and integration of physically, mentally and behaviorally challenged students without adequate assistance, makes teaching even more difficult.

I ask you to please support our teachers by contacting your MLA and expressing support for the teachers in your area.

Our teachers and especially our children deserve better.

N.D. Hughes

Surrey

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