North Delta’s George Mackie Library. James Smith photo

COLUMN: So what is ‘summer effect’?

Library programs help to combat learning loss over the summer break

By Minakshi Sidhu, Fraser Valley Regional Library

When kids stop reading, they lose some of what they learned over the school year. Known as the “summer slide” or “summer effect,” learning loss is a real phenomenon in which students can lose up to a month of knowledge during the summer. The long summer vacation breaks the rhythm of instruction, leads to forgetting and requires a significant amount of review when students return to school in the fall.

However, the summer effect can be avoided by ensuring children are as engaged as possible in whatever they choose to read — just as long as they’re reading every day. Here are some ways to keep them interested:

• Encourage your children to read books they enjoy. They are more likely to finish books they pick rather than ones forced on them.

• Make reading a social act. Establish a time during the day when all members of the family gather and read on their own.

• Connect your reading to family outings. For example, if you are going to a park, read about birds, plants, forests and small animals that you might see there.

• Provide incentives. If kids do their daily reading, take them out for a swim or baseball game or any other activity they like.

Another way to prevent your children from becoming rusty readers is joining the summer reading club (SRC) at your local library. This is a free literacy program aimed at getting kids up to Grade 7 to engage with libraries and reading. The libraries also have adult and teen reading clubs during the summer so the entire family can read together. SRC helps kids and teens read and learn all summer long, linking fun with maintaining skills.

There is something for everyone at your local library. Reading fiction, non-fiction, graphic novels or even magazines enhances your skills and, surprisingly, so does listening to audiobooks. However, despite the wealth of information on the internet, spending time online does not count as reading.

Keep reading fun and interesting by giving your children the opportunity to choose the books on their own. Reading is a necessity but it should also be fun.

Minakshi Sidhu is supervisor and community librarian at the George Mackie Library.

Just Posted

Surrey firefighters not among 267 being sent to battle Alberta wildfires

‘We haven’t been called upon to be deployed,’ Surrey Fire Chief Len Garis told the Now-Leader on Tuesday

Surrey man charged with impersonating cop in Newton

Harmit Johal, 42, is charged with one count of impersonating a peace officer and two counts of fraud

Man pleads guilty to Surrey crash that killed two Abbotsford women

Sarah Dhillon and Paige Nagata died following head-on collision on Nov. 4, 2018

Mother of accused charged in connection to Surrey teen’s murder

Manjit Kaur Deo charged with ‘accessory after the fact’ in 2017 death of Bhavkiran Dhesi

Killer of Calgary mother, daughter gets no parole for 50 years

A jury found Edward Downey guilty last year in the deaths of Sara Baillie, 34, and five-year-old Taliyah Marsman

Raptors beat Bucks 120-102 to even series at 2-2

Lowry pours in 25 as Toronto moves within two games of NBA Finals

Body of missing snowmobiler recovered from Great Slave Lake

Police confirm the body is that of one of three missing snowmobilers

Toddler seriously injured after falling from Okanagan balcony

RCMP are investigating after a two-year-old boy fell from the balcony of an apartment in Kelowna

Fraser Valley chef sentenced to seven years for million-dollar drug operation

Raymon Ranu has been working as a cook since he was arrested for selling fentanyl and cocaine

Cost jumps 35% for Trans-Canada Highway widening in B.C.

Revelstoke-area stretch first awarded under new union deal

Is vegan food a human right? Ontario firefighter battling B.C. blaze argues it is

Adam Knauff says he had to go hungry some days because there was no vegan food

Winds helping in battle against fire threatening northern Alberta town

Nearly 5,000 people have cleared out of High Level and nearby First Nation

Most Read