Domesticated animals will die in the wild

The little bunny, who will be a year old in March, has become a wonderful addition to our family.

I adopted a bunny, about three months old, that was dumped in a parking lot at the airport.

It was obvious he wasn’t wild and he was hiding under anything he could fit into and had a few tufts of grass to chew on. It was obvious he wouldn’t survive much longer and it became a mission of several colleagues and myself to rescue this little guy.

After a week, we succeeded and I ‘involuntarily’ volunteered to bring “Bugs” home. Our lab, Delores, took to Bugs right away. They are best buddies.

Not having any prior knowledge of rabbits, I educated myself and we knew the first thing we had to do was get him fixed.

We’ve found that our little bunny, who will be a year old in March, has become a wonderful addition to our family. He is messy with his hay, but uses the litter box like a pro.

And there is absolutely no way on Earth you can stop a bunny from chewing on wires, so it’s imperative you bunny-proof your home or give him a large space to live to get lots of exercise. Bugs lives in our laundry room where he has lots of cat toys to play with, pieces of branches to chew on, and boxes full of hay to hide in.

I shudder to think of what would of happened to Bugs if he was left in that parking lot.

Most people mean well when they get their child a pet rabbit, but they are a lot of work. They are messy and can do damage if they get into somewhere they shouldn’t. And they will multiply like crazy if given the chance.

People must really educate themselves before getting any pet. You must be responsible and commit to the long term.

And dumping any domesticated animal off in the wild is the worst thing you can do.

They cannot survive; it’s a certain death sentence.

 

Debra Naujoks

Delta

Surrey North Delta Leader