Legion fading away

Time is beginning to catch up to a membership that is dropping dramatically due to old age and death.

A letter writer laments the gradual decline of The Royal Canadian Legion

A letter writer laments the gradual decline of The Royal Canadian Legion

The Royal Canadian Legion is a dying entity, most unfortunately.

The legion has done a tremendous job of providing help for needy veterans and their families since its founding shortly after the First World War.

Its famous Poppy Fund, none of which goes to the legion branches for support, is used entirely for charitable work in the community. The legion branches once provided a haven for ex-service men who could get together to relive the war-time experiences with those with whom they served.

Entertainment and good fellowship flourished with the great number of veterans who partook of the comradeship offered. Ladies auxiliaries, always an integral part of legion life, helped establish the welcoming atmosphere of Legion membership.

Time is beginning to catch up to a membership that, in most cases, is dropping dramatically as the veterans of World War II and Korea, and their wives, move into old age and death. The scant number of veterans from later peacekeeping duties or the battles in Afghanistan are in no way sufficient to fill the ranks of the departed.

The legion has opened its membership requirements to all. This, however, hasn’t filled the depleting membership numbers. Another damper upon legion revenues are the stricter liquor laws that have depleted the best revenue asset, the bars.

Is there a solution to the problem? I don’t know. But I do know this: Any community in Canada that loses it Royal Canadian Legion branch will be the poorer for it.

 

Mike Harvey, Langley

Surrey North Delta Leader