Projected lights at the Garden Light Festival at Bear Creek Park. (File photo: Gord Goble)

OUR VIEW: Bear Creek stadium will serve Surrey well

There are sound reasons for the city building an ‘international recognized sanctioned stadium’

There are several sound reasons for the city building an “international recognized sanctioned stadium,” as Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum described it, in Newton’s Bear Creek Park.

Few people don’t already know where this iconic park is, located in a densely populated area not far south from the City Centre and within reasonable access to the bridges spanning the Fraser.

It is located near two major corridors – King George Boulevard and 88th Avenue – which fits with city council’s commitment to so-called “smart development,” or allowing densified development along major transportation routes. The 2,200-seat facility also fits with the city’s desire to promote “sports tourism” in Surrey, which the mayor says will help small businesses such as motels, restaurants, shopping and “so forth.”

READ ALSO: Surrey mayor vows to build ‘international’ stadium in Bear Creek Park

READ ALSO FOCUS: Cloverdale group putting Surrey city council ‘to the test’

Some people in Cloverdale are sore that this stadium concept for Bear Creek is making headlines just weeks after council in a five-four vote postponed an ice rink complex for that community.

While their concerns are valid, this does not diminish the inherent merits of the Bear Creek project.

McCallum presents sound arguments for the Bear Creek stadium that puts to rest any speculation that this could be a vanity project for this council or a “chicken in the pot” for Newton residents, who put in a strong show of support for the mayor at the polls on Oct. 20.

He reasonably notes that the northwest section of the city has borne the brunt of growth over the past couple of decades and needs more recreation and sports facilities as a result.

Cloverdale residents might well argue they share that condition too. But a dearth of sports and recreation facilities in one community does not mean projects in other communities should be abandoned.

— Now-Leader



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