Image pixabay.com

Image pixabay.com

OUR VIEW: Surrey needs to get tough on COVIDiots

We all share a stake in helping humanity turn the page on this coronavirus. It’s a team effort

It is our considered opinion that those people who flagrantly snub their nose at the dangers this pandemic presents to the public at large should be slammed with a fine so heavy that their impression be indelibly stamped into the ground.

For many people, unless they know someone personally who has been badly afflicted with COVID-19, those poor souls who are gasping for breath in ICU beds, or worse, occupy the realm of the far-removed, the domain of things that will never happen to me because such terrible things only happen to others.

And so, these despicably inconsiderate people carry on, rubbing elbows at crowded backyard parties, travelling abroad without self-quarantining afterward, or obnoxiously facilitating events that clearly defy common sense and moral responsibility.

READ ALSO: B.C. records 83 new COVID-19 cases as health officials warn of community exposures

READ ALSO: B.C. records 236 new COVID-19 cases over weekend

They don’t know, or worse, don’t care, that we all share a stake in helping humanity turn the page on this coronavirus. It’s a team effort.

Those who recklessly and repeatedly endanger their neighbours and public at large should now be corrected by way of financially spine-breaking fines.

The Public Health Act sets out penalties of $25,000 and six months jail time for non-compliance with health orders. A big stick is clearly required, to deter such ironically anti-social, social behavior.

Compassion and kindness are of course important. But so is protecting the vulnerable from meat heads who think they are impervious to COVID-19 and are quite willing to let others shoulder the risk and responsibility.

Now-Leader



edit@surreynowleader.com

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